Is Baltimore’s train station in the middle of nowhere? Is DC’s?

October 29, 2015

Our contributors recently got to comparing and contrasting Baltimore’s Penn Station with Union Station in DC. Some people say Penn Station is “in the middle of nowhere,” but the truth is that it’s closer to its respective downtown than Union Station. The difference is that Penn Station has fewer neighborhoods and tourist attractions nearby.Website Insert Passenger Trains Very Well copy

First, some details

Baltimore’s Penn Stations serves Amtrak trains on the Northeast Corridor, MARC trains on the Penn Line, and MTA Light Rail. The station station lies in between the neighborhoods of Mount Vernon, south of the station, and Station North, which is designated as Baltimore’s Arts and Entertainment District with venues such as The Charles Theatre nearby.

Union Station, Washington DC’s rail transportation hub, also serves Amtrak trains as the terminus of the Northeast Corridor, along with serving MARC, VRE, and Metro. It’s also a leisure destination with retail functions and eateries.

Is one of these stations “in the middle of nowhere?,” In this context, what does “middle of nowhere” even mean?

“Far” is all about perception

Penn Station isn’t in the middle of nowhere, says Matt Johnson. “It certainly isn’t more in the middle of nowhere than Union Station. I think it’s just a perception of how difficult is to get to ‘somewhere’ from Penn Station as compared to Union Station.”

“Baltimore Penn Station is 1.24 miles from Charles Center, the center of downtown Baltimore,” Matt adds. “Union Station, on the other hand, is 1.78 miles from Farragut Square, generally considered to be the centroid of downtown DC.”

Writing for Greater Greater Washington, Michael Lewis has the full story by clicking here.

 

Previous post:

Next post: